We ranked NFL teams’ continuity from 1-32: Bills and Chiefs lead the way

The coronavirus pandemic forced NFL teams to shut down this spring and summer, creating an offseason devoid of in-person organized team activities and minicamps.

This could be especially problematic for teams that made a lot of moves this offseason, or advantageous for clubs that maintained continuity from 2019 to 2020.

The Buffalo Bills top the league with 95.4% of their offense returning, while the defending NFC champion San Francisco 49ers lead the way on defense with 88.3% coming back. Meanwhile the Super Bowl champion Kansas City Chiefs return nearly their entire starting lineup and coaching staff. On the flip side, the Carolina Panthers return a league-low 58.2% of their offense and an even worse 36.2% of their defense under new coach Matt Rhule.

Here’s a look at what all 32 teams have coming back, ranked from most to least total snaps returning, courtesy of ESPN Stats & Information.

Jump to:
ARI | ATL | BAL | BUF | CAR | CHI | CIN
CLE | DAL | DEN | DET | GB | HOU | IND
JAX | KC | LV | LAC | LAR | MIA | MIN
NE | NO | NYG | NYJ | PHI | PIT | SF
SEA | TB | TEN | WSH

Offensive snaps returning: 95.4% (1st in NFL)
Defensive snaps returning: 80.4% (7th)
Starters returning: 23 (10 offense,10 defense, 3 special teams)

Non-coordinator assistants returning: 20 of 22
Coordinators returning: 3 of 3 (Brian Daboll, OC; Leslie Frazier, DC; Heath Farwell, ST)
Starting QB: Josh Allen, 3rd year
Head coach: Sean McDermott, 4th year (25-23)

What it means: Continuity is everything for a Bills team looking to take the next step as contenders. GM Brandon Beane has almost completely flipped this roster since he arrived in 2017 and turned Buffalo into a playoff team. The talent and depth in Buffalo in 2020 should produce its first division title since 1995. — Marcel Louis-Jacques


Offensive snaps returning: 84.5% (7th)
Defensive snaps returning: 84.9% (3rd)
Starters returning: 22 (10 offense, 10 defense, 2 special teams)

Non-coordinator assistants returning: 22 of 23
Coordinators returning: 3 of 3 (Eric Bieniemy, OC; Steve Spagnuolo, DC; Dave Toub, ST)
Starting QB: Patrick Mahomes, 4th year (3rd as starter)
Head coach: Andy Reid, 8th year (77-35)

What it means: If continuity counts for anything in this most unusual of seasons, the Chiefs are in good shape. Their theme for 2020 is “Run it back,” and with just about all of their key players from 2019 still around, that’s exactly what they’re shooting for. In addition, the only departure on the coaching staff is an assistant special-teams coach. — Adam Teicher


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1:13

Mike Wells previews what a Philip Rivers and Frank Reich team will look like but admits that Rivers isn’t a long-term solution at QB.

Offensive snaps returning: 87.9% (4th)
Defensive snaps returning: 77.3% (12th)
Starters returning: 20 (8 offense, 9 defense, 3 special teams)

Non-coordinator assistants returning: 12 of 18
Coordinators returning: 3 of 3 (Nick Sirianni, OC; Matt Eberflus, DC; Bubba Ventrone, ST)
Starting QB: Philip Rivers, 1st year with Colts (17th overall)
Head coach: Frank Reich, 3rd year (17-15)

What it means: Coach Frank Reich and general manager Chris Ballard have consistently talked about building a roster that sticks together to help with the team’s continuity. Returning 20 starters should pay dividends. The biggest question remains at quarterback because they signed Rivers from the outside. Rivers is an upgrade over Jacoby Brissett, who started in 2019, but he’s yet to do any work with his skill position players. The Colts hope Rivers’ experience — 16 years in the NFL — and having played in Reich’s system since 2013 will help overcome those issues. — Mike Wells


Offensive snaps returning: 77.3% (17th)
Defensive snaps returning: 88.3% (1st)
Starters returning: 21 of 25 (8 offense, 10 defense, 3 special teams)

Non-coordinator assistants returning: 16 of 18
Coordinators returning: 4 of 4 (Mike McDaniel, run game; Mike LaFleur, pass game; Robert Saleh, DC; Richard Hightower, ST)
Starting QB: Jimmy Garoppolo, 3rd year with 49ers (7th overall)
Head coach: Kyle Shanahan, 4th year (23-25)

What it means: The departures of defensive tackle DeForest Buckner and receiver Emmanuel Sanders were particularly painful, but the Niners replenished both spots with first-round picks. Perhaps more importantly, the Niners kept all but two coaches from last season, including all of their coordinators, allowing the many players still on the roster to remain in systems they know well and, presumably, improve because of it. “I think us having a lot of the same people in the building this year is going to be good for us, having that chemistry and being familiar with one another,” linebacker Fred Warner said. — Nick Wagoner


Offensive snaps returning: 80.1% (12th)
Defensive snaps returning: 84.4% (4th)
Starters returning: 23 (10 offense, 10 defense, 3 special teams)

Non-coordinator assistants returning: 11 of 13
Coordinators returning: 3 of 3 (Randy Fichtner, OC; Keith Butler, DC; Danny Smith, ST)
Starting QB: Ben Roethlisberger, 17th year
Head coach: Mike Tomlin, 14th year (133-74-1)

What it means: Not much is changing for the Steelers entering 2020 — and that’s mostly a good thing. Returning the bulk of the defense is key for the Steelers to end their brief playoff drought, and Roethlisberger’s return should bolster an offense that was stagnant at times in his absence. The Steelers have new faces on the coaching staff in quarterbacks coach Matt Canada and wide receiver coach Ike Hilliard, but they’ll be working with mostly veteran position groups. — Brooke Pryor


play

1:53

Doug Kezirian gives his prediction on if Deshaun Watson will throw for over or under 4,146.5 yards this season.

Offensive snaps returning: 83.3% (9th)
Defensive snaps returning: 75.7% (14th)
Starters returning: 20 (9 offense, 8 defense, 3 special teams)

Non-coordinator assistants returning: 14 of 16
Coordinators returning: 2 of 3 (Tim Kelly, OC; Brad Seely, ST)
Starting QB: Deshaun Watson, 4th year
Head coach: Bill O’Brien, 7th year (52-44)

What it means: There’s been turnover on offense at the skill positions (trading DeAndre Hopkins and trading for Brandin Cooks and David Johnson). The Texans return the majority of the defense and coaching staff that won the AFC South in 2019. One challenge will be having two coordinators in new roles in an offseason that lends itself to familiarity. The Texans promoted Anthony Weaver from defensive line coach to defensive coordinator, and offensive coordinator Tim Kelly is calling plays for the first time next season. — Sarah Barshop


Offensive snaps returning: 80.6% (11th)
Defensive snaps returning: 77.5% (11th)
Starters returning: 21 (9 offense, 9 defense, 3 special teams)

Non-coordinator assistants returning: 17 of 19
Coordinators returning: 3 of 3 (Pete Carmichael Jr., OC; Dennis Allen, DC; Darren Rizzi, ST)
Starting QB: Drew Brees, 15th year with Saints (20th overall)
Head coach: Sean Payton, 15th year (131-77)

What it means: The Saints are better equipped than most to handle a lost offseason. They’ve had the same head coach and quarterback for 15 years and have nearly every starter returning from a team that has gone 13-3 in back-to-back seasons. Coach Sean Payton and GM Mickey Loomis have compared this offseason to the 2011 lockout — after which the Saints went 13-3. “One of the things we do well is adjust,” Payton said. — Mike Triplett


Offensive snaps returning: 88.1% (3rd)
Defensive snaps returning: 69.8% (20th)
Starters returning: 20 (10 offense, 7 defense, 3 special teams)

Non-coordinator assistants returning: 15 of 17
Coordinators returning: 3 of 4 (Todd Wash, DC; Joe DeCamillis, ST; Mike Mallory, co-ST)
Starting QB: Gardner Minshew, 2nd year
Head coach: Doug Marrone, 4th year (22-28)

What it means: Owner Shad Khan has shown remarkable patience with his coaches despite minimal success since he took ownership of the team in 2012. The Jaguars are 38-90 in his eight seasons, with only one winning season (2017). Khan has had two head coaches during that span: Gus Bradley (14-47) and Marrone. — Michael DiRocco


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1:29

Domonique Foxworth explains why Dak Prescott is under more pressure than Tom Brady this year as Dan Orlovsky loses his patience with Max Kellerman’s Brady take.

Offensive snaps returning: 70.9% (26th)
Defensive snaps returning: 86.9% (2nd)
Starters returning: 22 (8 offense, 11 defense, 3 special teams)

Non-coordinator assistants returning: 23 of 24
Coordinators returning: 3 of 3 (Byron Leftwich, OC; Todd Bowles, DC; Keith Armstrong, ST)
Starting QB: Tom Brady, 1st season with Bucs (21st overall)
Head coach: Bruce Arians, 2nd year with Bucs, 8th overall (7-9 Bucs, 65-42-1 overall)

What it means: The Bucs have all 11 starters returning on defense, which should allow them to go deeper into coordinator Bowles’ 3-4 scheme now that they’ve gotten that transitional first year out of the way. The team made some key upgrades on offense by signing Brady and trading for tight end Rob Gronkowski. It’s really a matter of how quickly Brady can digest coach Arians’ playbook and if he can still make those home-run-deep throws Arians loves so much. — Jenna Laine


Offensive snaps returning: 75.6% (20th)
Defensive snaps returning: 81.6% (6th)
Starters returning: 23 (10 offense, 11 defense, 2 special teams)

Non-coordinator assistants returning: 7 of 16
Coordinators returning: 1 of 3 (Danny Crossman, ST)
Starting QB: Ryan Fitzpatrick, 2nd year with Dolphins (16th overall)
Head coach: Brian Flores, 2nd year (5-11)

What it means: The Dolphins bring back many of the same pieces from a bare-bones 2019 roster, and they have an enormous load of incoming talent to compete with the incumbents. It should look a lot more like Flores’ team, featuring a multiple defense in 2020, but a dramatic overhaul of the coaching staff (changes at offensive and defensive coordinator) combined with a bunch of incoming talent creates questions about how quickly everyone will be able to adjust in a largely virtual offseason. — Cameron Wolfe


Offensive snaps returning: 79.8% (13th)
Defensive snaps returning: 76.4% (13th)
Starters returning: 21 (9 offense, 9 defense, 3 special teams)

Non-coordinator assistants returning: 16 of 18
Coordinators returning: 3 of 3 (Nathaniel Hackett, OC; Mike Pettine, DC; Shawn Mennenga, ST)
Starting QB: Aaron Rodgers, 16th season (13th as starter)
Head coach: Matt LaFleur, 2nd year (13-3)

What it means: LaFleur has said several times during the virtual offseason he’s glad he’s not a first-year coach, but his second offseason was supposed to be one in which he and Rodgers revised the offense from their first year together. As Rodgers said after the NFC title game loss to the 49ers, there was room for the offense to evolve. “We really haven’t gotten into the tempo stuff at all,” Rodgers said at the time. “The scheme is there. The scheme and what Matt and his staff put together every week was fantastic. The execution and the moving pieces will continue to improve.” How much of that they can still implement without a full offseason may dictate how much they improve. — Rob Demovsky


play

2:05

Doug Kezirian, Joe Fortenbaugh and Preston Johnson are betting under the Raiders’ win total of seven because of their new circumstances in Las Vegas.

Offensive snaps returning: 94.0% (2nd)
Defensive snaps returning: 60.4% (28th)
Starters returning: 21 (11 offense, 7 defense, 3 special teams)

Non-coordinator assistants returning: 12 of 14
Coordinators returning: 3 of 3 (Greg Olson, OC; Paul Guenther, DC; Rich Bisaccia, ST)
Starting QB: Derek Carr, 7th year
Head coach: Jon Gruden, 3rd year of this stint with Raiders, 14th year overall (11-21 this stint with Raiders; 106-102 overall)

What it means: Continuity is key for the Raiders, especially in the middle of their move to Las Vegas. And while they do have a lot of starters returning, the front office upgraded and diversified several spots in free agency and the draft, especially at the offensive skill positions (WRs Henry Ruggs III, Lynn Bowden Jr.) and at linebacker (Cory Littleton, Nick Kwiatkoski) and in the secondary (CBs Damon Arnette, Prince Amukamara). There are few, if any, excuses now for Carr as he prepares to play in the same system for the third straight season. — Paul Gutierrez


Offensive snaps returning: 73.2% (23rd)
Defensive snaps returning: 78.1% (8th)
Starters returning: 18 (8 offense, 9 defense, 1 special teams)

Non-coordinator assistants returning: 13 of 16
Coordinators returning: 2 of 3 (Ed Donatell, DC; Tom McMahon, ST)
Starting QB: Drew Lock, 2nd year
Head coach: Vic Fangio, 2nd year (7-9)

What it means: Offensive coordinator Rich Scangarello was fired a week after the season. Fangio hired Pat Shurmur to replace Scangarello and Mike Shula as quarterbacks coach. Much of the draft was used to add more help around Lock, and as a result, the Broncos have several returning players who started games at receiver, for example, who will have a far more difficult time starting games this season. So, the Broncos’ “returning starters,” especially on offense, is a deceiving number in some ways, given the influx of rookies. — Jeff Legwold


Offensive snaps returning: 81.7% (10th)
Defensive snaps returning: 68.5% (21st)
Starters returning: 21 (10 offense, 8 defense, 3 special teams)

Non-coordinator assistants returning: 17 of 17
Coordinators returning: 4 of 4 (Greg Roman, OC; Wink Martindale, DC; Chris Horton, ST; David Culley, pass game)
Starting QB: Lamar Jackson: 3rd year
Head coach: John Harbaugh, 13th year (128-81)

What it means: The Ravens are among the Super Bowl favorites because they bring virtually everyone back from a team that had the best regular-season record last season. NFL MVP Lamar Jackson returns on a mission to win his first postseason game, along with 12 Pro Bowl players and the entire coaching staff. The biggest question is how Baltimore will replace guard Marshal Yanda, the second-best offensive lineman in team history. Continuity has long been a strength of the Ravens, who’ve had two owners, two general managers and three head coaches in their 25 years of existence. — Jamison Hensley


Offensive snaps returning: 78.6% (15th)
Defensive snaps returning: 71.7% (16th)
Starters returning: 22 (10 offense, 9 defense, 3 special teams)

Non-coordinator assistants returning: 17 of 20
Coordinators returning: 2 of 3 (Arthur Smith, OC; Craig Aukerman, ST)
Starting QB: Ryan Tannehill, 2nd year with Titans (9th overall)
Head coach: Mike Vrabel, 3rd year (18-14)

What it means: The Titans are banking on continuity being a plus for them on the offensive side of the ball. Having Tannehill execute Smith’s offense for a full season should bode well for the Titans. But the defense was hit with turnover, and Vrabel will have to shoulder more of a role following the departure of coordinator Dean Pees. The loss of veteran leadership through trades and free agency places a burden on younger players. — Turron Davenport


Offensive snaps returning: 69.6% (27th)
Defensive snaps returning: 77.8% (T-9th)
Starters returning: 17 (6 offense, 8 defense, 3 special teams)

Non-coordinator assistants returning: 14 of 17
Coordinators returning: 2 of 3 (Shane Steichen, 1st full season as OC after 8 games as interim in 2019; Gus Bradley, DC; George Stewart, ST)
Starting QB: Tyrod Taylor, 1st year with Chargers (9th overall)
Head coach: Anthony Lynn, 4th year (26-22)

What it means: The Chargers made aggressive moves in free agency and the NFL draft to upgrade their roster to contend in the AFC West. But two big questions remain in their effort to chase down the Chiefs: Will they be able to form an identity without Philip Rivers, and how quickly can a plethora of new starters meld with the returners with an abbreviated offseason? — Lindsey Thiry


17. Chicago Bears: 73.5% snaps returning

Offensive snaps returning: 84.1% (8th)
Defensive snaps returning: 62.8% (25th)
Starters returning: 19 (8 offense, 8 defense, 3 special teams)

Non-coordinator assistants returning: 15 of 19
Coordinators returning: 2 of 3 (Chuck Pagano, DC; Chris Tabor, ST)
Starting QB: Nick Foles, 1st year with Bears (9th overall) or Mitchell Trubisky, 4th year
Head coach: Matt Nagy, 3rd year (20-12)

What it means: Change was inevitable after the most unfulfilling Bears season in recent memory. Chicago lost (or could lose) three starters on each side of the ball depending on what happens in the highly anticipated quarterback derby between Mitchell Trubisky (incumbent) and Nick Foles (challenger). The coaching staff also took a hit — primarily on offense — as Nagy brought in trusted confidants (Juan Castillo, John DeFilippo and Bill Lazor) with ties to Philadelphia. Until the quarterback situation is settled, it’s impossible to predict whether the changes will have any impact. — Jeff Dickerson


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1:14

Matthew Berry explains why he believes DeAndre Hopkins will have more difficulty being targeted with the likes of Larry Fitzgerald and Christian Kirk sharing the field with him.

Offensive snaps returning: 76.6% (19th)
Defensive snaps returning: 70.3% (18th)
Starters returning: 16 (9 offense, 7 defense, 3 special teams)

Non-coordinator assistants returning: 15 of 19
Coordinators returning: 3 of 3 (Jeff Rodgers, ST; Vance Joseph, DC; Tom Clements, pass game)
Starting QB: Kyler Murray, 2nd year
Head coach: Kliff Kingsbury, 2nd year (5-10-1)

What it means: With so many players returning, the Cardinals are in a prime spot to take a major step forward following a five-win season. It’ll also help that Kingsbury has had a season to make NFL adjustments to his high-octane offense. But the Cardinals do have key additions such as wide receiver DeAndre Hopkins, defensive tackle Jordan Phillips, and linebackers Devon Kennard, Isaiah Simmons and De’Vondre Campbell who will need to get up to speed fast. — Josh Weinfuss


Offensive snaps returning: 85.1% (6th)
Defensive snaps returning: 62.9% (24th)
Starters returning: 18 (9 offense, 6 defense, 3 special teams)

Non-coordinator assistants returning: 11 of 17
Coordinators returning: 1 of 4 (Marwan Maalouf, ST)
Starting QB: Kirk Cousins, 3rd season with Vikings (9th overall)
Head coach: Mike Zimmer, 7th year (57-38-1)

What it means: Continuity is the buzzword for the Vikings’ offense. Zimmer liked what he saw from Cousins & Co. last year and said the same system, playcalls, motions and formations will remain in place to help this unit take another step forward. Defensively, it’s a different story. With two new co-defensive coordinators in Andre Patterson and Adam Zimmer, who will continue to coach their respective positions, along with a host of new position coaches and starters, the Vikings’ defense is set to undergo a period of evolution. — Courtney Cronin


Offensive snaps returning: 74.3% (21st)
Defensive snaps returning: 70.1% (19th)
Starters returning: 17 (8 offense, 8 defensive, 1 special teams)

Non-coordinator assistants returning: 15 of 18
Coordinators returning: 2 of 3 (Dirk Koetter, OC; Ben Kotwica, ST)
Starting QB: Matt Ryan (13th year)
Head coach: Dan Quinn, 6th year (43-37)

What it means: Ryan and Koetter working in unison for the second consecutive year will be key, especially as they work out the kinks from Koetter’s return to the Falcons last season. There is cohesion, in a sense, on defense. New defensive coordinator Raheem Morris has been a member of Quinn’s staff from the beginning and was a big part of the turnaround last season after being switched from receivers coach to work with the defensive backs. Now it’s about accelerating the growth of a handful of youngsters who missed on-field instruction during the virtual offseason. — Vaughn McClure


T-20. New York Jets: 72.3% snaps returning

Offensive snaps returning: 60.2% (31st)
Defensive snaps returning: 83.5% (5th)
Starters returning: 16 (6 offense, 8 defense, 2 special teams)

Non-coordinator assistants returning: 18 of 20
Coordinators returning: 3 of 3 (Dowell Loggains, OC; Gregg Williams, DC; Brant Boyer, ST)
Starting QB: Sam Darnold, 3rd year
Head coach: Adam Gase, 2nd year with Jets, 5th overall (7-9 with Jets, 30-34 overall)

What it means: The Jets have rare continuity on the coaching staff. In fact, this marks the first time since 2011 that all three coordinators are back under the same head coach. The theme continues on defense, where they have the fifth-highest percentage of returning snaps. The concern is the offense, which ranks 31st in returning snaps. Darnold will have two new receivers and at least three new linemen, a difficult transition that will be exacerbated by the truncated offseason. — Rich Cimini


Offensive snaps returning: 64.2% (29th)
Defensive snaps returning: 77.8% (T-9th)
Starters returning: 18 (8 offense, 7 defense, 3 special teams)

Non-coordinator assistants returning: 1 of 17
Coordinators returning: 1 of 3 (Nate Kaczor, ST)
Starting QB: Dwayne Haskins, 2nd year
Head coach: Ron Rivera, 1st year with Redskins, 10th overall (76-63-1 overall)

What it means: The Redskins needed major change, but they also needed a typical offseason. Haskins, with seven starts during his rookie season, must learn a new offense. While he’s reportedly done well in Zoom meetings and has dedicated his offseason to working out and learning Carolina’s offense (where coordinator Scott Turner was previously), he needs to be on the field. And he’s not alone. Meanwhile, the defense is changing from a 3-4 to a 4-3 under coordinator Jack Del Rio and a big emphasis has been on communication. The Redskins have a chance to build something better under Rivera, but the change and the offseason could lead to a bumpy start initially. — John Keim


Offensive snaps returning: 76.7% (18th)
Defensive snaps returning: 64.1% (23rd)
Starters returning: 18 (9 offense, 6 defense, 3 special teams)

Non-coordinator assistants returning: 14 of 20
Coordinators returning: 2 of 3 (Jim Schwartz, DC; Dave Fipp, ST)
Starting QB: Carson Wentz, 5th year
Head coach: Doug Pederson, 5th year (38-26)
What it means: The Eagles are the only team in the division not changing head coaches and believe they’ll benefit from the consistency. Philly opted not to directly replace offensive coordinator Mike Groh but is hoping the promotion of up-and-comer Press Taylor to pass-game coordinator along with the additions of Rich Scangarello, Andrew Breiner and Marty Mornhinweg to the staff will help fuse fresh concepts to a proven offense. — Tim McManus


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1:26

Rob Ninkovich foresees it being very difficult for teams to adhere to the NFL’s safety procedures for the reopening of facilities.

Offensive snaps returning: 87.4% (5th)
Defensive snaps returning: 53.8% (31st)
Starters returning: 19 (9 offense, 8 defense, 2 special teams)

Non-coordinator assistants returning: 14 of 17
Coordinators returning: 0 of 3
Starting QB: Jared Goff, 5th year
Head coach: Sean McVay, 4th year (33-15)

What it means: The Rams are undergoing their most significant changes since McVay’s arrival in 2017 and will face another uphill battle in a strong NFC West. Goff and the offense must find an identity without running back Todd Gurley, Brandon Staley must prove himself as an upgrade from legendary defensive coordinator Wade Phillips and a replacement must be found for dependable kicker Greg Zuerlein. — Lindsey Thiry


Offensive snaps returning: 73.7% (22nd)
Defensive snaps returning: 64.3% (22nd)
Starters returning: 18 (8 offense, 7 defense, 3 special teams)

Non-coordinator assistants returning: 14 of 19
Coordinators returning: 3 of 3 (Brian Callahan, OC; Lou Anarumo, DC; Darrin Simmons, ST)
Starting QB: Joe Burrow, 1st year, or Ryan Finley, 2nd year
Head coach: Zac Taylor, 2nd year (2-14)

What it means: Cincinnati didn’t have much staff turnover after the NFL’s worst season in 2019. QB Joe Burrow, the No. 1 overall draft pick, inherits a lot of continuity and a slew of capable weapons, including running back Joe Mixon and receivers A.J. Green and Tyler Boyd. The Bengals spent the offseason overhauling the defense by adding pieces such as defensive tackle D.J. Reader, cornerback Trae Waynes and safety Vonn Bell. Cincinnati should show progress in ’20 and make strides toward ending a four-year playoff drought. — Ben Baby


Offensive snaps returning: 67.1% (28th)
Defensive snaps returning: 70.4% (17th)
Starters returning: 18 (7 offense, 8 defense, 3 special teams)

Non-coordinator assistants returning: 18 of 20
Coordinators returning: 6 of 6 (Brian Schottenheimer, OC; Ken Norton Jr., DC; Brian Schneider, ST; Dave Canales, offensive passing game; Brennan Carroll, running game; Andre Curtis, defensive passing game).
Starting QB: Russell Wilson, 9th year
Head coach: Pete Carroll, 11th year with Seahawks, 15th overall (100-59-1 with Seahawks, 133-90-1 overall)

What it means: The biggest change with the Seahawks will come along their offensive line, where they project to have at least three new starters in front of Wilson. The Seahawks can credibly say they upgraded their offensive line even without a big-name addition, but here’s where the potential problem lies: Continuity is as important to that position group as any, and a shortened offseason because of the coronavirus pandemic means Seattle’s revamped offensive line will get fewer reps together than it normally would. — Brady Henderson


27. Detroit Lions: 68.7% snaps returning

Offensive snaps returning: 78.8% (14th)
Defensive snaps returning: 59.3% (29th)
Starters returning: 16 (9 offense, 5 defense, 2 special teams)

Non-coordinator assistants returning: 11 of 17
Coordinators returning: 1 of 3 (Darrell Bevell, OC)
Starting QB: Matthew Stafford, 12th year
Head coach: Matt Patricia, 3rd year (9-22)

What it means: The Lions have one of the better offensive groups in the league as long as Stafford & Co. stay healthy. Defensively there are questions, but the lack of continuity could be misleading. Detroit brought in three potential starters (Danny Shelton, Jamie Collins and Duron Harmon) from New England, where Collins and Harmon played under Patricia and Shelton is expected to have a similar role. Their understanding of the playbook and the roles they will have in the defense should go smoother than a typical free agent. — Michael Rothstein


Offensive snaps returning: 77.7% (16th)
Defensive snaps returning: 58.5% (30th)
Starters returning: 18 (8 offense, 7 defense, 3 special teams)

Non-coordinator assistants returning: 2 of 17
Coordinators returning: 1 of 3 (Mike Priefer, ST)
Starting QB: Baker Mayfield, 3rd year
Head coach: Kevin Stefanski, 1st year

What it means: The Browns are banking that a new coaching staff headed by Stefanski, combined with a pair of new starting tackles in Jack Conklin and 10th overall pick Jedrick Wills Jr., will revive a talented offense that struggled behind Mayfield last season. — Jake Trotter


play

0:54

Dianna Russini breaks down how the NFL perceives the Patriots’ offense without Tom Brady at quarterback.

Offensive snaps returning: 63.0% (30th)
Defensive snaps returning: 71.8% (15th)
Starters returning: 18 (9 offense, 7 defense, 2 special teams)

Non-coordinator assistants returning: 9 of 11
Coordinators returning: 3 of 4 (Josh McDaniels, OC; Steve Belichick/Jerod Mayo, de facto DCs)
Starting QB: Jarrett Stidham, 2nd year (1st as a starter) or Brian Hoyer, 1st year back with team (13th overall season)
Head coach: Bill Belichick, 21st with Patriots, 26th overall (237-83 with Patriots, 273-127 overall)

What it means: There is a lot of continuity, but this will be a test on how much not having it at QB will affect the team as a whole. For the first time in 19 years since Tom Brady became a starter, the Patriots are in transition at the game’s most important position. — Mike Reiss


Offensive snaps returning: 71.2% (25th)
Defensive snaps returning: 61.6% (26th)
Starters returning: 19 (8 offense, 8 defense, 3 special teams)

Non-coordinator assistants returning: 4 of 21
Coordinators returning: 1 of 3 (Kellen Moore, OC)
Starting QB: Dak Prescott, 5th year
Head coach: Mike McCarthy, 1st year with Cowboys, 14th overall (125-77 overall)

What it means: Not having a traditional offseason program hurts the Cowboys and McCarthy, but the makeup of the team could allow them to overcome it. Five of the eight returning starters on offense have played in at least one Pro Bowl. On defense, they have a number of key players back. The secondary lost two starters in free agency, but they have three corners who all saw significant time. McCarthy will keep most of the offense the same to aid Prescott’s development, which is a big reason why Moore was retained, but McCarthy will add his flair to the offense as well. — Todd Archer


Offensive snaps returning: 71.4% (24th)
Defensive snaps returning: 61.0% (27th)
Starters returning: 18 (9 offense, 7 defense, 2 special teams)

Non-coordinator assistants returning: 5 of 14
Coordinators returning: 1 of 3 (Thomas McGaughey, ST)
Starting QB: Daniel Jones, 2nd year
Head coach: Joe Judge, 1st year

What it means: The Giants are still near the beginning of their rebuild. They have a young quarterback learning a new system and a first-year head coach. This group will need time to be molded into the team Judge desires. The offense should be further along this year because of the heavy investment (three consecutive top-six picks) in recent years. The defense remains a work in progress, and could take at least another offseason to develop its new identity. — Jordan Raanan


Offensive snaps returning: 58.2% (32nd)
Defensive snaps returning: 35.2% (32nd)
Starters returning: 13 (5 offense, 5 defense, 3 special teams)

Non-coordinator assistants returning: 1 of 20
Coordinators returning: 1 of 3 (Chase Blackburn ST)
Starting QB: Teddy Bridgewater, 1st year with Panthers (7th overall)
Head coach: Matt Rhule, 1st year

What it means: This basically is a complete rebuild with a new staff led by first-year NFL coach Rhule and a roster that will be without most of the key leadership and talent on both sides of the ball. The offense has a chance to be decent with the return of running back Christian McCaffrey and wide receiver DJ Moore and addition of Bridgewater. The defense is a work in progress since middle linebacker Luke Kuechly surprisingly retired with all seven draft picks going to that side. — David Newton

Published at Fri, 12 Jun 2020 12:36:14 +0000

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